IndexBox has just published a new report: ‘EU – Fish Fillets (Dried, Salted Or In Brine, But Not Smoked) – Market Analysis, Forecast, Size, Trends and Insights’. Here is a summary of the report’s key findings.

The revenue of the preserved fish fillet market in the European Union amounted to $751M in 2018, approximately equating the previous year. This figure reflects the total revenues of producers and importers (excluding logistics costs, retail marketing costs, and retailers’ margins, which will be included in the final consumer price). Over the period under review, preserved fish fillet consumption continues to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. Over the period under review, the preserved fish fillet market reached its peak figure level in 2018 and is expected to retain its growth in the immediate term.

Consumption By Country

The countries with the highest volumes of preserved fish fillet consumption in 2018 were Italy (28K tonnes), Poland (16K tonnes) and the UK (13K tonnes), with a combined 49% share of total consumption. Spain, the Netherlands, France, Romania, Portugal, the Czech Republic, Belgium, Hungary and Greece lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 39%.

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of preserved fish fillet consumption, amongst the main consuming countries, was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, the largest preserved fish fillet markets in the European Union were France ($138M), Italy ($132M) and the Netherlands ($110M), together comprising 51% of the total market. These countries were followed by Spain, Poland, Romania, the Czech Republic, Belgium, Hungary, Greece, Portugal and the UK, which together accounted for a further 35%.

The countries with the highest levels of preserved fish fillet per capita consumption in 2018 were Italy (469 kg per 1000 persons), the Netherlands (463 kg per 1000 persons) and Poland (407 kg per 1000 persons).

Market Forecast 2019-2025 in the EU

Driven by increasing demand for preserved fish fillet in the European Union, the market is expected to continue an upward consumption trend over the next seven years. Market performance is forecast to retain its current trend pattern, expanding with an anticipated CAGR of +2.6% for the seven-year period from 2018 to 2025, which is projected to bring the market volume to 139K tonnes by the end of 2025.

Exports in the EU

The exports totaled 30K tonnes in 2018. In general, preserved fish fillet exports continue to indicate a slight contraction. In value terms, preserved fish fillet exports amounted to $160M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018.

Exports by Country

In 2018, Denmark (17K tonnes) represented the key exporter of fish fillets (dried, salted or in brine, but not smoked), committing 56% of total exports. Sweden (4,361 tonnes) took the second position in the ranking, followed by Spain (3,007 tonnes), the UK (2,113 tonnes) and Germany (1,526 tonnes). All these countries together took approx. 36% share of total exports. The following exporters – Italy (554 tonnes) and Belgium (526 tonnes) – each finished at a 3.6% share of total exports.

Exports from Denmark increased at an average annual rate of +8.1% from 2007 to 2018. At the same time, Belgium (+16.1%) and Spain (+4.2%) displayed positive paces of growth. Moreover, Belgium emerged as the fastest-growing exporter in the European Union, with a CAGR of +16.1% from 2007-2018. By contrast, Italy (-1.5%), the UK (-4.7%), Sweden (-5.7%) and Germany (-12.8%) illustrated a downward trend over the same period. While the share of Denmark (+33 p.p.) and Spain (+3.6 p.p.) increased significantly in terms of the total exports from 2007-2018, the share of the UK (-4.8 p.p.), Sweden (-13 p.p.) and Germany (-17.7 p.p.) displayed negative dynamics. The shares of the other countries remained relatively stable throughout the analyzed period.

Imports in the EU

The imports totaled 60K tonnes in 2018, jumping by 9.8% against the previous year. Over the period under review, preserved fish fillet imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern.

In value terms, preserved fish fillet imports totaled $386M (IndexBox estimates) in 2018. In general, preserved fish fillet imports, however, continue to indicate a relatively flat trend pattern. The most prominent rate of growth was recorded in 2014 when imports increased by 9.7% y-o-y. In that year, preserved fish fillet imports reached their peak of $433M. From 2015 to 2018, the growth of preserved fish fillet imports remained at a somewhat lower figure.

Imports by Country

The countries with the highest levels of preserved fish fillet imports in 2018 were Italy (14K tonnes), Denmark (12K tonnes) and Spain (9.8K tonnes), together recording 60% of total import. The Netherlands (6,113 tonnes) ranks next in terms of the total imports with a 10% share, followed by Sweden (8%), Portugal (5.9%) and Germany (5.4%).

From 2007 to 2018, the most notable rate of growth in terms of imports, amongst the main importing countries, was attained by Portugal, while the other leaders experienced more modest paces of growth.

In value terms, Italy ($119M), Spain ($73M) and Denmark ($51M) appeared to be the countries with the highest levels of imports in 2018, with a combined 63% share of total imports. The Netherlands, Sweden, Germany and Portugal lagged somewhat behind, together comprising a further 28%.

Source: IndexBox AI Platform



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