The data you would need isn’t available. There are two ways ETH2 makes random numbers:

  1. Randao. Different stakers make hash chains, i.e hashes of hashes of hashes etc. They post the final hash. Next round they post the preimage of that hash, and all the preimages get hashed together to make a random number. Then they do the preimage of that preimage, etc. Since hash functions are unpredictable and they’re all keeping their hash chains private, you can’t predict the number.

  2. Verifiable delay function. This uses a pseudorandom function that’s designed to take a very long time to run, but can be verified relatively quickly, and to help prevent anyone from having a hardware advantage, they’re going ahead and working on an ASIC for the function. So you can predict what the number will be, but calculating that prediction will take as long as the protocol itself.

(A third way to do it is with threshold signatures, where when any m of n people submit a signature, you get a random output, and that output is (1) unpredictable because nobody knows other people’s private keys, and (2) the same no matter which m of n people sign. But I think this method is vulnerable to quantum computers.)



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How Does ETH 2.0 Handle Having Pseudorandom Numbers Rather Than Truly Random Numbers? : Ethereum
How Does ETH 2.0 Handle Having Pseudorandom Numbers Rather Than Truly Random Numbers? : Ethereum
How Does ETH 2.0 Handle Having Pseudorandom Numbers Rather Than Truly Random Numbers? : Ethereum
How Does ETH 2.0 Handle Having Pseudorandom Numbers Rather Than Truly Random Numbers? : Ethereum

How Does ETH 2.0 Handle Having Pseudorandom Numbers Rather Than Truly Random Numbers? : Ethereum

How Does ETH 2.0 Handle Having Pseudorandom Numbers Rather Than Truly Random Numbers? : Ethereum